Adventures in #change11 and other MOOCs

 

I’ve been on hiatus from MOOCing About posting, but I haven’t been on hiatus from MOOCing. Having a delightful experience in #clmooc - here is the MOOC description from the #clmooc G+ Community. 

Making Learning Connected (#clmooc) is a collaborative, knowledge-building and sharing experience open to anyone who is interested in making, creativity, and learning. We will design and engage in “makes”—creative projects— that tap into our personal (and professional) interests. Then, we’ll share what we’ve done with Making Learning Connected community, learn from each others’ experiences, and reflect on our own growth. We’ll be agents in the recursive creation and re-creation of this experience we’re describing as a Massive Open Online *Collaboration* (MOOC). Throughout the MOOC, we’ll engage with and employ Connected Learning principles as they relate to making and learning.

One of my fellow #clmoocers made his avatar using ClayYourself.com. Here’s mine. What can I say…I spent ALOT of time in Second Life. :D

I’ve been on hiatus from MOOCing About posting, but I haven’t been on hiatus from MOOCing. Having a delightful experience in #clmooc - here is the MOOC description from the #clmooc G+ Community. 

Making Learning Connected (#clmooc) is a collaborative, knowledge-building and sharing experience open to anyone who is interested in making, creativity, and learning. We will design and engage in “makes”—creative projects— that tap into our personal (and professional) interests. Then, we’ll share what we’ve done with Making Learning Connected community, learn from each others’ experiences, and reflect on our own growth. We’ll be agents in the recursive creation and re-creation of this experience we’re describing as a Massive Open Online *Collaboration* (MOOC). Throughout the MOOC, we’ll engage with and employ Connected Learning principles as they relate to making and learning.

One of my fellow #clmoocers made his avatar using ClayYourself.com. Here’s mine. What can I say…I spent ALOT of time in Second Life. :D

Attempting to do some rapid catch up this morning on #cfhe12 - Current/Future State of Education, hosted in Desire2Learn. Hitting some significant drag at lift off. Took log in weirdness in stride (system showed me as logged in but when I clicked link from Course Content, system showed me as guest. There was a note from admin that they were having log in issues—reset password as instructed. I tried a few more rounds, didn’t manage to get out of guest mode when in the Course Content, and moved on to view the presentations that have happened. Screen shot here is the result of attempt to view Jeff Selingo presentation archive in GoToMeeting (I tried Safari, Chrome and Firefox—same message for each). I don’t have time to jump into Twitter to find what’s up with this. I imagine it will get solved. Moved on to watch Siva Vaidhyanathan’s presentation which was offered up as a .mov. Yay for success but by now, enthusiasm seriously dampened.
I expect a little drag. More than a little, as I experienced today, is rough.

Reducing drag is one of the main concerns of aeronautical engineers when designing aircraft. Drag can stress different parts of an aircraft which can lead to structural failure during certain maneuvers. Further, reduction of drag has a “domino” effect on other important aspects of flight. The less drag an aircraft has, the faster an aircraft can go, or the less power is needed from the engine. Less powerful engines are generally lighter (that is, have less weight) and need less fuel (that is, cost less to fly). A lighter aircraft means that less lift is needed to fly and the airplane can be more maneuverable. If less lift is needed, a smaller wing is required which decreases weight and drag. All of this, taken together, reduces the cost of building and flying the airplane.

Attempting to do some rapid catch up this morning on #cfhe12 - Current/Future State of Education, hosted in Desire2Learn. Hitting some significant drag at lift off. Took log in weirdness in stride (system showed me as logged in but when I clicked link from Course Content, system showed me as guest. There was a note from admin that they were having log in issues—reset password as instructed. I tried a few more rounds, didn’t manage to get out of guest mode when in the Course Content, and moved on to view the presentations that have happened. Screen shot here is the result of attempt to view Jeff Selingo presentation archive in GoToMeeting (I tried Safari, Chrome and Firefox—same message for each). I don’t have time to jump into Twitter to find what’s up with this. I imagine it will get solved. Moved on to watch Siva Vaidhyanathan’s presentation which was offered up as a .mov. Yay for success but by now, enthusiasm seriously dampened.

I expect a little drag. More than a little, as I experienced today, is rough.

Reducing drag is one of the main concerns of aeronautical engineers when designing aircraft. Drag can stress different parts of an aircraft which can lead to structural failure during certain maneuvers. Further, reduction of drag has a “domino” effect on other important aspects of flight. The less drag an aircraft has, the faster an aircraft can go, or the less power is needed from the engine. Less powerful engines are generally lighter (that is, have less weight) and need less fuel (that is, cost less to fly). A lighter aircraft means that less lift is needed to fly and the airplane can be more maneuverable. If less lift is needed, a smaller wing is required which decreases weight and drag. All of this, taken together, reduces the cost of building and flying the airplane.

MOOC Survival Strategies 101 - Hootsuite Dashboard for MOOC hashtags. And yes, 403x (#stanfordedf), as previously posted, is (not a) MOOC.

MOOC Survival Strategies 101 - Hootsuite Dashboard for MOOC hashtags. And yes, 403x (#stanfordedf), as previously posted, is (not a) MOOC.

Screenshot of a Screencast introduction by George Siemens (I think—he didn’t introduce himself) for #CFHE12 - Current/Future State of Higher Education cMOOC (c for Connectivism). Starting today. As you can see, Gates Foundation is a sponsor along with Athabasca University, basecamp for two of the course catalysts, George Siemens and Stephen Downes. Here is George’s welcome. And here’s an animated overview and invitation to join the six-week course by the third facilitator, Dave Cormier. Register here.

Screenshot of a Screencast introduction by George Siemens (I think—he didn’t introduce himself) for #CFHE12 - Current/Future State of Higher Education cMOOC (c for Connectivism). Starting today. As you can see, Gates Foundation is a sponsor along with Athabasca University, basecamp for two of the course catalysts, George Siemens and Stephen Downes. Here is George’s welcome. And here’s an animated overview and invitation to join the six-week course by the third facilitator, Dave Cormier. Register here.

These days a person could spend every waking hour MOOC-ing. I have one friend who almost is…participation in several MOOCs simultaneously requires a lot of video viewing, at a minimum.

Recently, I advised a young friend transitioning into a Masters Program after a year off focusing on work—she was seeking strategies for keeping up with the volumes of reading she needs to do every week, and of course, comprehension which is always useful ;D

Videos present a unique challenge. While exploring what professors Tyler Cowen and Alex Tabarrok are up to with Marginal Revolution University, I discovered one possible approach in a post by Alex—Speed Video. Wow.

WiredAcademic interviewed the pair of blogger/professors from George Mason University. Keyword in the pair’s vision: #participatory. +1

Day 1 of Stanford School of Ed’s (not a MOOC) 403x
That’s Roy Pea on the set of 403x. Stanford is certainly one of the hotspots of MOOC experimentation and evolution - with the runaway success of Thrun and Norvig’s AI class, Thrun’s exodus (“Having done this, I can’t teach at Stanford again…I feel like there’s a red pill and a blue pill, and you can take the blue pill and go back to your classroom and lecture your 20 students. But I’ve taken the red pill, and I’ve seen Wonderland.”) and launch of Udacity, and Coursera’s innovations like tapping the long tail and “callibrated peer-review.”
As Stanford makes clear in the 403x overview, THIS IS NOT A MOOC. But it’s certainly related. 403x - open to the public for participation and no credit - looks at the digital future of education and asks some big questions.
I especially enjoyed reading this statement (‘bout time someone noticed):

…the boundary between high school and college is becoming ever more fluid, to the point where it is largely symbolic and a potential impediment to positive innovation.

Course readings are here. Course session summaries will be found in the right-hand sidebar,—here’s Day 1.

Day 1 of Stanford School of Ed’s (not a MOOC) 403x

That’s Roy Pea on the set of 403x. Stanford is certainly one of the hotspots of MOOC experimentation and evolution - with the runaway success of Thrun and Norvig’s AI class, Thrun’s exodus (“Having done this, I can’t teach at Stanford again…I feel like there’s a red pill and a blue pill, and you can take the blue pill and go back to your classroom and lecture your 20 students. But I’ve taken the red pill, and I’ve seen Wonderland.”) and launch of Udacity, and Coursera’s innovations like tapping the long tail and “callibrated peer-review.”

As Stanford makes clear in the 403x overview, THIS IS NOT A MOOC. But it’s certainly related. 403x - open to the public for participation and no credit - looks at the digital future of education and asks some big questions.

I especially enjoyed reading this statement (‘bout time someone noticed):

…the boundary between high school and college is becoming ever more fluid, to the point where it is largely symbolic and a potential impediment to positive innovation.

Course readings are here. Course session summaries will be found in the right-hand sidebar,—here’s Day 1.

Why I love #DS106 and CogDogBlog: Playfulness extremely alive and well. Discovery—now I know about iTimeLapse = Delight. 
CogDog (alias Alan Levine) is celebrating ds106 day. +1

Why I love #DS106 and CogDogBlog: Playfulness extremely alive and well. Discovery—now I know about iTimeLapse = Delight. 

CogDog (alias Alan Levine) is celebrating ds106 day. +1

Start of Coursera Model Thinking course with Scott E Page, U of Michigan. This screen shot from the Where are you from? thread in the General discussion forum sums up in a single image something quite unique about the mooc-ing of education. It’s really quite an extraordinary thing to witness as a participant. (I’m not getting into the nuances of MOOCs here….I’ll leave that to @audreywatters.)

Start of Coursera Model Thinking course with Scott E Page, U of Michigan. This screen shot from the Where are you from? thread in the General discussion forum sums up in a single image something quite unique about the mooc-ing of education. It’s really quite an extraordinary thing to witness as a participant. (I’m not getting into the nuances of MOOCs here….I’ll leave that to @audreywatters.)

Reading Yong Zhao. Anyone else? Would love to be reading with a few others. Good incentive to finish it. Certainly relevant to #edstartup.

Reading Yong Zhao. Anyone else? Would love to be reading with a few others. Good incentive to finish it. Certainly relevant to #edstartup.

Beginning EdStartUp 101. Caught the tail end of the facilitators hangout this morning and then watched the beginning archived on the site. I watched a few of the intro videos that are appearing on the site. Hello to my fellow EdStartup participants.